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Life Without Furniture

In Life Without Furniture ‘the whole visible world flows through one white birch.’ Sharon Fagan McDermott inhabits the spaces between the common and the uncommon: the rich landscapes between ‘A State of Un-Union’ and ‘Driving Home After Singing at Club Café,’ the ineffable sensations between ‘The Geography of Solitude’ and ‘The Hymn of Constellations.’ Even the poems’ titles signal the many resonances of Life Without Furniture. The whole world, visible and invisible, inhabits this wonderful new book.”

— Terrance Hayes

 

“Sharon Fagan McDermott’s Life Without Furniture is remarkable for the generosity of its attention and the precision with which its renders the objects of that attention. ‘What I Won’t Tell Myself’ begins by noticing how ‘the moon salts the sky with stars’ and then brings that gaze indoors, to where a ‘young dog twitches a dream / against my calf.’ These poems move through interior and exterior landscapes, between elegy and praise song. Through such keen observation, the ordinary is uplifted, the way that, in ‘Summer Prayer: Pennsylvania,’ the ‘beloved dead’ ‘console us with such luminous days / that we remember them all over again.'”

— Nancy Reddy

Yes, We Be


Yes, We Be is an integrated-design poetry book that connects with the Black Arts Movement, Harlem Renaissance and Afro-Futurism. Proceeds will benefit Black Lives Matter, SistaWRITE, and COR AME community programs.

 

“Patrick Howell’s Yes We Be is affirmation and confirmation of the resilience of Black people and Black poetry. Reminiscent of Amiri Baraka’s A Black Value System, as well as Haki Madhubuti’s Book of Life and Rise Vision Comin—Black Arts meditations laying down a foundation for being.”

— Tony Medina

 

“In the tradition of Langston Hughes and Walt Whitman, Howell writes a truly American poetry in the language of the streets, office cubes, living rooms, bars—the everyday landscape of humanity. In poems at once ecstatic and reflective, Howell celebrates his heritage while unblinkingly portraying the African American experience. A modern day hymnal for, of, and by the people, his music will reverberate long after the last page has been turned.”

— Angela Narciso Torres

Anonymous

“Anonymous follows vulnerable bodies impelled to service—for work, lust, purgation, and song. Even that last knells from halls where “the applause is from the whips.” This, the caustic art of Monique-Adelle’s often brutal debut: for every several of its dahlias, there also wait parasites. I wouldn’t claim the grotesques, here, amplify the beauties; rather, the one bleeds steady into the other. “No room for honeystomach,” the poet, steeled, tells us. From this exceptional collection, such a lament rings as tune and warning.”

— Douglas Kearney

 

“Monique-Adelle Callahan ushers forth a style/voice that is uniquely and wholly her own. This selection of poems demonstrates the complexities of fragility and strength… a fierce fusion of poetic precision and experimentalism.”

— Jaki Shelton Green

Dazzle

“With a jeweler’s lapidary skill, Alison Stone has fashioned a string of gemlike poems that indeed (dare I say it?) dazzle—with wisdom, wit, and brio. She’s crafted every line to a high polish, rich in metaphor and music. Wide-ranging in subjects—so much to catch the eye—this book brims with “the shimmer, the shiver, the quicksilver / flickers. The sparkle, the dazzle of poetry.” Readers, enjoy!”

— Richard Foerster

 

This powerful book from award-winning poet Alison Stone delves deeply into human experience. Employing both formal and free verse, these musical poems make the reader feel, think, and ultimately, come away changed from having encountered them.

 

To each animal its nature. Birds fly,
cats grab things that dangle. Children play. I lie.

 

You ask for my true, hidden self, your arms
open like wings. To my dismay, I lie.

 

On a stone-strewn path, I pause and kneel; recite
words of surrender. Even when I pray, I lie.

 

Praise for Alison Stone’s Poetry

“Stone is not a ‘literary’ poet (there are enough of them)… She is interested in a woman’s truth, and has something hard won (but won) to give her readers. This is strong poetry.”

— Allen Grossman

 

“Stone offers lean and sparkling poetry that invites us to join with it — poems that are, in their way, multi-faceted spaces to explore, discovering what we may, and grafting what we bring.”

— Timothy McLafferty

Ghazal Cosmopolitan

“A marvelous interweaving of poetry, scholarship, literary criticism and memoir…” – Marilyn Hacker

 

“…a gift that enriches our literature…” Eleanor Wilner

 

“”…a celebration of, and a love letter to, the language of the world…” Fady Joudah

 

“…a smorgasbord of aesthetic pleasures viewed through the prism of the majestic Ghazal…” Azra Raza

 

“…a bridge between the eastern and western traditions of literature…” Raza Rumi

 

“I particularly like (her) emphasis on the ghazal’s potential to adapt, and her own ghazals…” Marion Molteno

I Want to Undie You

A ritual of grace and love for what remains in memory after great loss.

 

I Want To Undie You is Jaki Shelton Green’s unflinching cry of sorrow at the untimely death of her daughter Imani; and Jaki’s insistence, through her grief, on the joyful remembrance and celebration of Imani’s life.

 

This book-length poem, interspersed with Barbara Tyroler’s photographic compilations, is printed in a limited edition art gallery version, using 80# gloss interior paper in an 8 by 10 format to better highlight the imagery of the poems and the photos.

In Case of Sudden Free Fall

“Grown-up poems for grown-ups.”

 

— Stuart Friebert

 

“I loved reading In Case of Sudden Free Fall, Deborah Bogen’s beautiful and remarkable oneiric prose poem collection. A delicious gem, it takes the reader on a soulful and transformative journey. Under Bogen’s expert guidance, we travel from enchantment to melancholy, to surprising encounters with literary and artistic figures, to loss and death, and back to wonder. I’ll keep revisiting this collection time and again.”

 

— Hélène Cardona

Ardor

“In Ardor, Tina Kelley crafts nineteen love poems to the world, celebrating the details of the daily—a new garden, town names on an atlas, the sound of swallowing. She pays close attention to language, writing an ode to the preposition “of” and trying to find the word for “the look a woman / gives a man 20 years younger before she realizes she’s / 20 years older.” With tenderness and humor, she remembers pregnant friends, sick friends, quirky godmothers. Something new unfolds in these poems of praise every time one returns to them.”

 

— Zeina Hashem Beck

Duet

Two of our most celebrated poets, Dorianne Laux and Joseph Millar, weave together poems about music in a chapbook that riffs on the theme of the title; the poems move forward on unnumbered pages, two voices singing.
 
Two covers too – so when you order email us to let us know which one you want – the blue, or the red and yellow.

Duet is the ­ first publication by Jacar Press in the Greatest Hits series. This chapbook series was founded by editor Jennifer Bosveld at Pudding House Press nearly two decades ago. It was acquired by Sammy Greenspan of Kattywampus Press in 2010, and will now be published by Jacar Press under the editorship of David Rigsbee.               

 

Gnomon

“After experience is done teaching us just about everything it thinks it needs to teach us, we come back to desire, the one thing worth knowing.  This time around desire shows up as a wild calm, dead center of whatever picture in which we find ourselves.  These marvelous, subtle poems go deep, deep, deep into that wild calm.  So subtle, so moving!  I don’t believe anyone but Cynthia Huntington could have written them.”
— David Rivard